7.18.2009

sophisticated children's clothing





Aren't these pieces from French label Le Vestiaire de Jeanne beautiful? I love the way the outfits are styled, especially the black leggings with black canvas shoes under a white dress. (Maybe I need to get some Bensimon's or Tom's?) The French have perfected this look-- simplicity at it's best. Although I can't help but be a little creeped out by how much this little girl looks just like a tiny adult in these clothes. Oh well, just because I grew up wearing t-shirts and Umbros (remember those?) doesn't mean everyone has to!

38 comments:

anneemall said...

I've always had mixed feelings about this site. I love the clothes, but you're right, they make children look like adults. The way the kids pose doesn't creep me out as much this year as before though. It used to be pics of very serious-looking kids, posing just like grown-ups and I'd think 'poor kids, they seem punished, they'd be better off laughing and playing outside' (http://blog-vdj.blogspot.com/2007_11_01_archive.html for instance).

Hanna said...

I think I'd wear any of those outfits! And yeah... I think that girl probably looks older than me! (but I look pretty young)

loraborealis said...

I absolutely love how these outfits are styled! Thank you for introducing me to all these great finds. :) Though I do have to agree on how this little girl looks and poses just like an adult.

Theresa Hannah said...

I still wear my umbros, but just around the house - they're great for gardening! Should I not be admitting that? Those clothes are gorgeous, though...kinda wish I'd had a girl I can dress up instead of my 2 boys :)

Liz said...

I wish I had those clothes now! My wardrobe was also filled with umbros, Vaurnet, and jams. Ah, the 80s.

Anonymous said...

Perhaps that's the secret to French style. They start 'em young.

texasnorth said...

My hisband and I were just talking about Umbros... he totally laughed at me. They were SO the hot thing when I was in school, though!

texasnorth said...

uh, that's HUSband.

Suzy said...

oh thank god. i thought you were going to write about how you wanted to dress your future-kids this way. beautiful clothing, just maybe not for children.

and i've been DYING for a pair of Bensimon's for, uh, ever. I just can't decide which style! Oh, to have them all...

erica said...

have you looked at jeanne's older sister's site? http://vdc-blog.blogspot.com/

she's more grown up than i am!

Anna said...

Hi,
I enjoy your blog and seeing these pretty things! They're gorgeous in their simplicity. (And they do make me think a little of Pipsqueak Chapeau for children). I've been debating between a pair of Tom's and Bensimon. I want the more comfortable of the two and haven't yet tried Tom's on to be able to compare...

Anonymous said...

I just wanted to say I actually really like Le vestiaire de Jeanne and Le vestiaire de Clé. I wish I could go back and wear the kids' clothing - I would have loved it.

Also, I think the greatest part is that Jeanne, Clémence and Charlotte (the designer, who's in her early twenties) are sisters. Charlotte began these collections when she was in med school, for her little sisters and Clé's line of clothing is actually meant for adults, hence why she's dressed more "maturely". In their "about" write-up, they talk about how much fun they have together developing the designs (because it IS a collaboration) and planning photo shoots, etc.

Maybe that influences my perception of the clothing, but I don't think so. I think the fun they're having comes through in the design.

But what do I know? :)

Danielle

modaspia said...

i love this line, her work is so incredible and inspiring. the model always looks sweet and natural to me. a beautiful girl in beautiful clothes that suit a child. the ralph lauren, gap ads for children's clothing make me cringe on the other hand.

jenny gordy said...

if i had children i would dress them in this clothing if they liked it and had fun in it. i think it's really beautiful. i also like "younger" looking children's clothing as well. i don't think there's anything wrong with either. i guess it's just weird for me to see a little girl looking more mature than myself!

k-ron said...

i really, REALLY heart my tom's. my sister and i have like 6 pairs between us, because they come in such awesome prints! they kind of replaced chucks for me.

meredith cheng - munaluna said...

very beautiful clothes, but I think it's too sophisticated for children. Children are suppose to have fun and getting their clothes dirty! If I spent so much on clothing for my future little ones and they got dirty, I would have a fit!

Creative Cotton said...

Yeah you are right! French are the best in the faishon world, for women or for kids. I live here so I can see it everyday. The people are also very conscious about their clothings and look. Specially women and girls! No can beat them. The dresses you presented are very pretty. Perfect for coquette french gals.:)

Jill said...

I've dressed my now-8 year old daughter Tallulah in many of these clothes for the past three years. Despite some feelings expressed here that these clothes are too mature for young children, they are anything BUT. In fact, it's near-laughable to me, to consider these too mature: I originally selected these garments for my daughter as the best alternative to what's in the stores for her age: tiny, tummy-baring halters; short-shorts; skin-tight Capri pants, spaghetti-strapped sundresses etc….. all fabricated in the junkiest polyester, cheap cottons, and constructed with horrendous seam work.Collectively, the offerings for young girls are poorly made and WAY too tart-looking!

LVDJ, on the other hand, floats around a young girl's body like a cloud. The designs frankly are quite modest: occasionally there are bare shoulders. The garments are loose, soft yet durable, comfortable, and provide the freedom of movement that a child loves. Any piece goes with any other piece, providing the opportunity for a very young girl to creatively select her own combinations- and each mix is fabulous. And as a very-particular seamstress, I so value the top-quality linen which washes dozens of times and still looks beautiful; the true French and flat-felled seam work, and the generous hems.

Two more thoughts: First, LVDJ garments are pricey, so I’ve used them to augment my own sewn pieces in my daughter’s wardrobe. But having even one of them in-hand to examine will change how a good seamstress sews. They are designed and constructed with beautiful simplicity and they are replete with wonderful finishing ideas.

Finally, I’d like to revisit the thought that these garments are two mature. If you could see in-person, a young girl wearing these soft, flowing garments, you would see the truth of these clothes: the solid colors and plain fabrics display the gentle beauty of a young girl’s soft complexion and beautiful, flexible body in the best possible way. Instead of cheap, scratchy fabrics with big glittering peace-sign emblems, studs, sequins, denim with holes punched-through…….. these simple, soft, fluid shapes are a PERFECT foil for the delicacy of young girls.

These are beautiful clothing pieces, and my daughter has yet to wear one anywhere without someone asking about the origin of them.

Regards,

Jill

Anonymous said...

feeling broody, Wiksten?

Anonymous said...

Perhaps the thought that this clothing is too mature for children stems from the fact that many current styles for women are designed to complement a more childlike figure (as opposed to a curvy one)? For me, women's clothing often has a defined waist and accommodates a bra, but that is just my definition and opinion is probably based on my body, and fustration with current styles. I do agree that this clothing is sophisticated, but it seems built for play and a kid's body, needs, and whims. I guess childhood/adulthood definitions are pretty personal/cultural. Very nice and thought provoking post!

Lynn said...

Ha - bet you never thought you'd get everyone so worked up with this post! I totally agree with you though; there's something just a little off about the photos. Maybe just the way the little girl holds her shoulders? It does look a bit too "mature", but I'm sure it's the way she was directed to hold herself. Beautiful clothes nonetheless!

Sad lil' knitter said...

this has nothing to do with children's clothes.... I feel like I am a single human being who embodies the lives of both you and your husband. All I want to do is hang around my carefully decorated apartment and sew & knit, but instead what I end up doing is running around the hospital where I am a surgery resident. The knitter in me both resents and accepts the surgeon, and the surgeon in me wants to be at home but also can't tear herself away from the hospital.

Melinda said...

I've got to agree that the clothes are too adult for a kid of this age and that white dress (3rd pic down) is waaaaaaay to sexy. When my daughter is that age there is no way she'll be wearing clothes that sexy. If they were for an adult though, they'd be gorgeous.

joyce said...

Ah, I love this designer and the simplicity of the clothes. I've bought a few pieces for myself in the children's sizes 10 and 12 since the clothes do have lots of room. I love the linen and how soft and flowy they clothes wear.

Catherine said...

I think the maturity in these photos comes from the way the clothing and model is presented - the moves, the poses, quite woman-like. Maybe is she were to smile or galavant about, it would bring the clothing and the age of the girl a little closer.

Obviously each to their own, and I would dress an older child in these maybe, but for pre-schoolers and primary school kids I like something more innocent and fun (without those wretched cartoon prints, Dora et al).

I think if a grown woman starts admiring how a child dresses (and wanting to dress like them), something is amiss!

Anonymous said...

The ONLY one I would balk at would be the pillowcase-style white dress and even that can be easily layered. I'm really flummoxed; what does everyone think IS "appropriate?" I am just not seeing a problem here, so maybe someone can actually explain what is so offensive about aesthetically pleasing children's clothing. I could understand if it were gaudy clubbing outfits with three-inch heels but these are just simple dresses! ???

samantha hahn said...

ohhh.....
wish they had adult sizes Jenny@!

my name is elly said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
erica-knits said...

Ha! Umbros, I totally had those and sweat sets with cute baby animals silkscreen on the front. Ew! What happened to children's clothing?! It's so cool these days.

jenny gordy said...

wow, i seriously had no idea this would be so controversial! i didn't mean to offend by the last two sentences of my post. i think it's an awesome clothing line, and i was just poking fun at myself. i don't think there should be any rules for dressing children. when it comes down to it, i agree with elly, each person has to do what makes them (and their child) feel comfortable. that's different for everyone. and i'm sure it depends on what you can afford too. i honestly have no idea what i'll dress my kids in when (and if) i have them. hopefully lots of clothes handmade by me!

Anonymous said...

jenny can say what she wants; it's her blog. i just don't get how some of the commenters are talking about sweet, knee-length, jewel-neck dresses in the same context with protecting children from pedophiles. what should children wear, according to the experts here? by the way, i have daughters, and i'm not naive.

my name is elly said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Anonymous said...

ok, now we're getting somewhere. i did go to the site, but didn't see anything topless. i totally agree that would be dangerous.

another thing i was thinking about though, i think we can get a false sense of security by putting the burden on our daughters and ourselves regarding what they wear. i'm absolutely not an expert and someone please correct me if i'm wrong, but i doubt it really matters to a predator what the child is wearing. the only foolproof protection is to not let them out of your sight.

thanks for the clarification on what was bugging you, because i totally agree that is "over-the-top."

Anonymous said...

I love the post that mentions seeing little girls in orchestrated outfits walking down the street and then worries about adults checking out her young child - so funny!

There was actually a marginally related article in the NYT this week -
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/16/garden/16nudity.html?_r=1&hpw

Too each his (or her) own. I think we should get back to what's important here, umbros! I lived in them too! lol!

Jennifer said...

It's funny. I see nothing but a child looking like a child in these photos. Dancing and playing. The clothes are beautiful and simple. The clothing takes a back seat to the beauty of the child. I think that's how it should be. I have three girls and only wish I could afford to dress them in these.

oakglasses said...

I love the clothes, but I totally see what you mean about the maturity of the whole presentation. I think people are confusing sexual maturity with maturity period. Anyway, I don't think these clothes necessarily preclude stomping around in the sandbox (the pricetag, on the other hand...).

However, speaking for myself, I'd rather keep these clothes for myself and dress my child like this:

http://referencelibrary.blogspot.com/2009/07/have-you-ever-seen-anything-like-it-not.html

THAT is precious children's dressing!

April

silvercocoon said...

i love that she is wearing birkenstocks (and makes them look cute!) in the last couple shots!

Anonymous said...

i like these clothes. im 13 and im short for my age. i dont like being at school and im dressed like a 5th grader and all my other classmates look like 8th graders. this is something that i would definitely wear with a tshirt under it.